Nevada State Clean Diesel Program

Nevada recognizes the need to reduce emissions from the state’s existing fleet of public and privately owned diesel-powered equipment.  This is particularly important where “sensitive” populations such as asthmatics, children, and the elderly are exposed to diesel exhaust emissions.  The Nevada State Clean Diesel Program works to achieve these fundamental goals:

  • Deliver significant reductions in diesel emissions in terms of tons of pollution produced and reductions in diesel emissions exposure from vehicles, engines, and equipment operating in areas designated as poor air quality areas;
  • To reduce the exposure of “sensitive” populations to the harmful components of diesel exhaust emissions from diesel-powered vehicles; and,
  • To reduce diesel emissions in order to help improve and maintain air quality in communities across Nevada.

The Nevada State Clean Diesel Program utilizes, in part, federal grant funds made available through the National Clean Diesel Campaign and authorized by the Diesel Emission Reduction Act to support Program eligible diesel emission reduction solutions.  Historically, the NDEP has worked with municipal fleets and school districts across the state to replace and retrofit diesel-powered equipment.

Under the National Clean Diesel Campaign’s State Clean Diesel Program, eligible diesel emission reduction solutions include:

  • Verified emission control technologies such as exhaust controls, cleaner fuels, and engine upgrades;
  • Verified idle reduction technologies;
  • Verified aerodynamic technologies and low rolling resistance tires; and
  • Certified engine replacements and/or certified vehicle or equipment replacement.  Eligible diesel vehicles, engines and equipment may include buses, Class 5 through 8 heavy-duty highway vehicles (vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 16,001 pounds and over), marine engines, locomotives and nonroad engines, equipment or vehicles used in construction, handling of cargo (including at a port or airport), agriculture, mining or energy production (including stationary generators and pumps).

Visit the EPA's State Clean Diesel Grant Program webpage to review program materials.

To enquire about applying for program funding, or for more information regarding the Nevada State Clean Diesel Program, contact Joe Perreira (jperreira [at] ndep.nv.gov).

Clean Diesel Program Successes

2017

Check back soon.  Projects and awards for FY 2017 Program funds are still being finalized.

2016

With FY 2016 Program funds, the NDEP has partnered with the City of Reno to support the early retirement and replacement of three pieces of diesel-powered equipment.  This equipment (a sewer/vacuum truck, a dump truck, and a nonroad tractor) operates within the Truckee Meadows and their early retirement will provide the City with quantifiable emissions reductions that will help improve and maintain air quality.

NDEP and City of Reno staff shake hands in front of a brand new sewer/vacuum truck
NDEP and City of Reno staff in front of Reno's brand new sewer/vacuum truck.

2015

The NDEP partnered with the Douglas County School District to support the early retirement and replacement of three school buses.  The early retirement of these buses will reduce the exposure of school age children to particulate matter and other harmful components of diesel exhaust emissions.

2013

The NDEP helped fund the early retirement and replacement of an older diesel-powered street sweeper in Carson City.  The replacement street sweeper meets 2010 diesel emission standards.  In addition to reducing tailpipe emissions through their expected equipment service life, the new street sweeper will the added benefit of reducing dust on county roads that, if left in place, would contribute to particulate matter emissions.

Two members of NDEP staff stand in front of Carson CIty's new Tymco street sweeper
Two members of NDEP staff stand in front of Carson City's new Tymco street sweeper.

2012

Partnering with the Clark County Department of Public Works, the NDEP helped fund the early retirement and replacement of an older diesel-powered street sweeper that operated in Las Vegas.  The replacement street sweeper meets 2010 diesel emission standards.

Clark County's replacement Elgin street sweeper.
Clark County's replacement Elgin street sweeper.

2011

Program funds were focused on reducing emissions by eliminating unnecessary engine idling in school buses.  Diesel engines are commonly left to idle during cold weather startup; this is done to warm the engine and cabin prior to the first school bus route of the day.  Unfortunately, this also results in diesel emissions in the ambient air as well as a buildup of diesel emissions in the cabin.  An idle-reduction technology known as a fuel-operated engine heater was selected to reduce emissions.  These timer-activated heaters burn a small quantity of fuel to warm the engine prior to each day’s use, eliminating the need for startup idling.  In addition to emission benefits, these heaters save the school districts diesel fuel and result in less wear-and-tear on the engines.  Approximately 400 fuel-operated heaters in eight Nevada school districts were installed.

A fuel operated engine heater is installed in the luggage compartment of this school bus.
A fuel operated engine heater is installed in the luggage compartment of this school bus.

2010

The very oldest diesel-powered school buses in daily operation were targeted for replacement with new, lower emission models.  Seventeen new school buses meeting 2010 diesel emission standards were delivered to school districts across the state and those old, high mileage buses were permanently retired.

State and school district officials line up for a photo in front of some brand new school buses.
State and school district officials line up for a photo in front of some brand new school buses.

2008-2009

In the Program’s first two years, permanent emissions reductions were achieved in more than 250 school buses in nine school districts across the state.  School buses with vehicle model years 1991 through 2004 were retrofitted with emission reduction components.  These buses had Diesel Oxidation Catalyst and Closed Crankcase Ventilation Systems installed.  These components were selected from the EPA Verified Technology list of proven aftermarket emission reduction components.

A Crankcase Ventilation Filter System has been installed on this Nevada school bus.
A Crankcase Ventilation Filter System has been installed on this Nevada school bus.
A Diesel Oxidation Catalyst System has replaced the muffler on this Washoe County school bus's exhaust system.
A Diesel Oxidation Catalyst System has replaced the muffler on this Washoe County school bus's exhaust system.

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